Posts Tagged ‘planning’

  • How vulnerable is your supply chain to disruption and dislocation? Do you have a limited number of suppliers, or multiple ones, with potential alternatives for emergencies?
  • How long could your company or organization withstand disruption and dislocation to your supply chain or other logistical risks?
  • Do you have contingency plans and alternate solutions in place to deal with such conditions?
  • What preventive and mitigation measures do you have in place?
  • How quickly and efficiently can you respond to supply shocks and threats to lines of communication?

I’m never too busy to discuss your needs or those of anyone else you feel may benefit from meeting or talking to me. So feel free to contact me at any time!

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2015 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

So we finally come to step 6 in the abbreviated battle readiness procedure I’ve been describing: Execution.

In the army we always said that “a plan is only good until you cross the line of departure.” Eisenhower said something very similar: The plan is nothing, but planning is everything (or words to that effect).

We have to be ready to adjust our execution to the exigencies of the situation and the reality on the ground. Competitors, clients, suppliers, distributors, other stakeholders, no one does exactly what we were expecting them to do. Things go awry and plans go off track. We have to anticipate, react, and shape the battlefield. We have to manoeuvre to get things back on track, and get our opponents to react to us rather than the other way around.

The best way to do this is to keep our objective(s) front and center. When all else fails, we can still achieve our aims by focusing on the outcome we’re trying to achieve. If we’ve exercised sound leadership and implemented the fundamentals of sound battle readiness I’ve been writing about, then our people (and we ourselves) will be able to adapt and thrive in this demanding, ever changing, environment.

I’m never too busy to discuss your needs or those of anyone else you feel may benefit from meeting or talking to me. So feel free to contact me at any time!

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Step 5 in the Battle Readiness Procedure we’ve been covering is Rehearsal and Preparation. The key to this step is to ensure everyone knows the plan and what role they have in it. Military leaders are taught to give their direction and plan using the SMESC format:

S–Situation: What is the friendly and enemy situation? What is the lay of the land, the climate and weather, etc?
M–Mission: What is the essential role of the team or organization in the higher unit’s plans?
E–Execution: How will the mission be achieved? What are all the moving parts, the tasks of each element, and the resources they have to achieve their part of the plan?
S–Support & Logistics: What are the special supply and logistical arrangements to support the overall plan, including personnel and medical support?
C–Command, Control & Communications: What is the chain of command and succession? Are there special communication and control measures (including codewords, etc)?

Rehearsals and practice runs are the key to ensuring everyone fully understands their own role(s) as well as those of others in the unit. There are many forms of practice and rehearsal, from “chalk talks,” to war games to full dress rehearsals to get all the parts of the machine synchronized and in full working order.

I’m never too busy to discuss your needs or those of anyone else you feel may benefit from meeting or talking to me. So feel free to contact me at any time!

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Step 4 in the Battle Readiness procedure we’ve been examining is the estimate and plan.

  • The estimate is a sequential process for assessing the situation and determining key factors, options, and consequences of actions (friendly and enemy). The result of the estimate is a plan.
  • This might seem a bit obvious, but the estimate always starts with a clear understanding and statement of the AIM. You have to know your objective before you can analyze your courses of action and decide on the best one. Omitting the aim is ALWAYS the biggest mistake people make.
  • The key factors to consider in formulating options and plans are:
    • Climate & weather (social, economic, and political environments)
    • Enemy (competitors, big and small, old and new)
    • Terrain (markets)
    • Friendly forces (products and services)
    • Time & space (when, where, how long)
    • Speed & surprise
    • Resources at your disposal (and any gaps)
    • Logistics & support
    • Command, control, communications (who’s in charge, etc.)
  • Generate different courses of action, both for you and for COMPETITORS and other STAKEHOLDERS (whether supportive or hostile). Select the optimal course of action.
  • Your plan should be based on the optimal solution to achieve your aim. Discarded or sub-optimal courses of action (friendly and enemy) may provide input for contingency planning and risk management.

I’m never too busy to discuss your needs or those of anyone else you feel may benefit from meeting or talking to me. So feel free to contact me at any time!

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Pour mieux préparer vos troupes à votre prochaine offensive, faites donc appel à… un militaire !

Richard Martin a servi comme officier des Forces canadiennes pendant 21 ans et y a acquis une très grande expérience en matière de leadership et de stratégie militaire.

Il applique à l’entreprise les vertus essentielles qui font la force des armées : la rigueur et la discipline. Richard Martin forme et entraine les équipes de direction avec les méthodes qui engendrent des bons résultats et font gagner des batailles !

Il animera pour votre équipe de direction un véritable BRIEFING DE PRÉPARATION AU COMBAT qui conduira votre entreprise à la victoire…

« Sachez qu’un bataillon de 750 personnes peut se préparer et se positionner pour une opération de combat en aussi peu que 3 à 4 heures. Qu’attendez-vous pour en faire autant avec votre équipe de direction et mettre votre entreprise sur un pied de guerre ? » – Richard Martin

Durée : 3 à 4 heures, à vos bureaux

Coût : devis sur demande, selon objectifs à atteindre

Inscrivez votre entreprise IMMÉDIATEMENT !

Communiquez avec Claude Janet, pour Richard Martin, Président, fondateur, ALCERA, Conseil de gestion Inc.

T : 514 453-3993

claude.janet@alcera.ca

http://www.alcera.ca

Vidéos disponibles sur : http://www.alcera.ca/fr/videos-teleconferences.php

Richard Martin est l’auteur de « Brilliant Manoeuvres: How to Use Military Wisdom to Win Business Battles ».

Brilliant Manoeuvres is Sun Tzu’s Art of War combined with Drucker’s The Effective Executive.”

— Alan Weiss, PhD, Author of the bestselling Million Dollar Consulting

Les étapes et le contenu peuvent varier selon les objectifs de l’entreprise/organisation, l’avis professionnel et l’expérience de Richard Martin ou encore les besoins du moment. Il faut surtout se laisser guider par la réalité stratégique ou tactique et non pas juste suivre un procédé rigide. Richard Martin a l’expertise, la discipline et la rigueur pour vous guider dans cette opération délicate.

Attention! Le port de l’uniforme n’est pas exigé… 😉

We’ve been looking at the 6 steps in the simplified “battle procedure” for business. Last week we covered step 1, issuing a warning order to your troops. This week we cover step 2, the time estimate.

Too often leaders launch into planning–or worse–executing their plans without conducting a proper time estimate. Simply put, a time estimate is the process of identifying all of the key steps you need to do to accomplish your mission and achieve your end state (or immediate objective). Here are steps for conducting a time estimate.

  • When must you be finished or have achieved your mission/aim?
  • What time/date is it now?
  • How much total time is available (whether minutes, hours, days, weeks, or months)?
  • What are the key tasks and steps you need to accomplish to achieve your aim?
  • How much time is required for each of these tasks/steps?
  • What can be done concurrently or launched early?
  • What is essential and what is only desirable or ancillary?
  • Are the specific intermediate milestones or timelines you must respect?

Once you have this information, you list all of these tasks, including concurrent ones, then you work back from the deadline or end state milestone to the current time. That gives you all of the key tasks on the critical path along with concurrent tasks and items that can be delegated to others.

I’m never too busy to discuss your needs or those of anyone else you feel may benefit from meeting or talking to me. So feel free to contact me at any time!

Ask me about my new “Battle Procedure Briefing” for business.

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

The military teaches a comprehensive procedure for getting a unit of any size ready for combat and operations. It’s called “battle procedure,” and it is also highly useful for business application. The complete procedure has 17 steps, but I’ve distilled them down to 6 main phases and adapted them for business. This can be done very deliberately or in a more hasty manner, depending on the situation and need for speed.

I’ll also go into each phase over the next few weeks, but for now, here is a short list to give you a taste:

  1. Warning Order: Receive a warning from higher up that an operation is brewing. Alternatively, you may also notice a significant change in the business situation that requires planning and action on your part.
  2. Do a Time Estimate: This is a technique for determine all the key actions that must occur between deciding to launch an operation and the actual “h-hour.”
  3. Conduct Reconnaissance: I was taught in the army that “time spent in reconnaissance is rarely wasted.” Too often, business managers and entrepreneurs go into a significant operation without scouting the competitive terrain and scoping out the opposition.
  4. Do Your Estimate and Formulate Your Plan: The estimate is a sequential process for assessing the situation and determining key factors, options, and consequences of actions (friendly and enemy). The result of the estimate is a plan.
  5. Rehearse and Prepare: This is the step where everyone involved goes through the entire plan to ensure they know what they have to do, when they have to do it, and what they have to do to support others or adjust on the fly, as needed.
  6. Execute: This is self-explanatory, but there are some nuances we need to address.
    I’m creating a new intervention around this and will be announcing it within a few weeks. I’m thinking of calling it “Corporate Battle Preparation”.

Stay tuned…

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Planning involves seeing beyond the next hill and getting everyone in your team to see to appreciate the essentials of its situation. The leader’s main planning role is to decide on the why, what and how of any initiative.

  • Asking Why determines the content of your plan. Consider a range of options before making a decision on which to pursue. Assuming there is sufficient time, this may be an opportune moment to gain input and suggestions from followers and collaborators.
  • Asking What determines your mission. You have to determine what your boss, the organization as a whole, and your peers throughout the organization expect you and your team to accomplish. Additionally, you must also incorporate the needs and concerns of customers (if you have any) and any external stakeholders. Your mission is the unique and essential contribution of you and your team to the objectives of the organization.
  • Asking How determines the content of your plan. Consider a range of options before making a decision on which to pursue. Assuming there is sufficient time, this may be an opportune moment to gain input and suggestions from followers and collaborators.

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the 8th of these principles.

  1. Understand the trade-offs and advantages of delegation and participation. Bring others into your decision-making and planning if you have the time, they have the expertise, and you need to get them involved to ensure their full commitment.
  2. Decide when you’ve got sufficient (but not complete) information or knowledge.
  3. Consider multiple options and compare them against all relevant decision factors and your objectives.
  4. Focus your personal leadership efforts on the most critical aspects and delegate the rest.
  5. Break big problems down into smaller ones and assign them to subordinate leaders or teams.
  6. Never keep more than 1/3 of the available planning time for yourself and ensure you leave at least 2/3 for your subordinates to make their own decisions and plans.
  7. Consider alternative courses of action as potential contingency plans if your initial estimates or assumptions prove incorrect.
  8. Start planning for subsequent developments once the current operation is underway.
  9. Incorporate risk management and mitigation into your decision-making and planning. Consider worst-case and best-case scenarios.
  10. Assume you don’t have all the information or knowledge you need. In other words, there is always uncertainty and you can’t prepare for every possible contingency.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

When a crisis strikes, you can’t just manage in the normal manner, you also have to exercise effective crisis leadership. Too often executives see their role during a crisis as managing the organization’s image and communicating with the public through the media. This is a necessary function, but it is only one small part of crisis leadership and management. Crisis leadership involves the following principles:

  1. Take charge of the situation.
  2. Recognize what is happening.
  3. Confirm information before reacting.
  4. Maintain situational awareness.
  5. Lead from the front.
  6. Implement contingency plans and procedures immediately while initiating deliberate decision-making about the next steps.
  7. Continue planning ahead.
  8. Act, assess, and adjust.
  9. Care for yourself and for your subordinates.
  10. Maintain morale and cohesion within your team or organization.

Richard Martin is a consultant, speaker, and executive coach. He brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to exploit change, maximize opportunity, and minimize risk.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.