Posts Tagged ‘personal development’

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the 9th of these principles.

  1. Practise new procedures and for new types of operations if at all possible.
  2. Conduct regular after action reviews and seek to incorporate lessons learned.
  3. Develop or incorporate complementary competencies within your team or organization.
  4. Make sure everyone understands fully the mission, intent and plan before going into action.
  5. Provide training or education for individuals and groups if they haven’t done it before or they don’t current have all the qualifications.
  6. Give your subordinate leaders a certain freedom action to accommodate individual and team differences.
  7. Encourage moderate levels of internal rivalry and competition.
  8. Monitor morale, mood, and cohesion closely.
  9. Work on continuous and never-ending improvement.
  10. Be generous in praise and quick to correct mistakes or misinterpretations.

Richard Martin is a Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the 7th of these principles.

  1. Realize that everyone is expendable, including you.
  2. Assume that all your followers are potential leaders until they prove otherwise.
  3. Leadership can and must be developed.
  4. Match responsibilities to knowledge and skill levels.
  5. Remember it’s easier to teach knowledge and skills than to change attitudes.
  6. Create a professional development framework so everyone knows what is required and expected in order to progress.
  7. Stimulate your followers intellectually and emotionally.
  8. Challenge your followers, especially if you think they have high leadership potential.
  9. Provide ongoing coaching, mentoring, training, and feedback.
  10. Tell people where they stand.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the 6th of these principles.

  1. Get out of your office and talk to your followers, colleagues, and other stakeholders.
  2. Ask your followers about themselves.
  3. Have a regular “platoon commander’s hour.”
  4. Every once in a while get in the “snake pit” and answer questions from your followers.
  5. Ensure your followers have the best training, professional development, leadership and resources they need to carry out their missions.
  6. Ensure your followers’ creature comforts are reasonable and taken care of.
  7. Ensure fairness and reasonable equivalence in privileges and amenities across your team or organization.
  8. Provide regular feedback.
  9. Monitor the mood, morale, and cohesion of your team or organization.
  10. Care about the person, not just the position.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the fourth of these principles.

  1. Take your profession seriously and be a model of professional competency and development.
  2. Assume everyone is looking to you and will imitate you in your comportment, demeanour, and words.
  3. Walk the walk and talk the talk, but remember that actions speak louder than words.
  4. Own up to mistakes and errors, and correct them immediately.
  5. Follow the golden rule. Respect goes both ways.
  6. Be willing to make hard decision and to justify and explain them if necessary. Don’t just “rule by fiat.”
  7. Be firm but fair. Explain your decisions when they concern people directly.
  8. Know what you stand for and make sure others know it also.
  9. Be honest with yourself and others.
  10. If you don’t know, say so. You can always find out or ask for someone’s advice or input.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I have been focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the third of these principles.

  • Volunteer for important missions and responsibilities.
  • Plan ahead when you have a new mission or responsibility.
  • Get out of your comfort zone. If you’re not at least a bit nervous, you’re not taking enough risk.
  • Learn about and try out new approaches.
  • Take the blame when things go poorly, and praise your team when things go well.
  • Remember that no one is shooting at you.
  • Responsibility means being able to answer for your decisions, actions, and behaviour. Responsibility = accountability.
  • Put your attention on what you can control and either manage risk for the rest, or forget about it.
  • Risk should only be accepted with a corresponding chance of reward.
  • As a leader you’re part of “the system,” and represent the institution. So you can’t blame “the man” because you’re him.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

In the next weeks I will be focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the second of these principles.

  • Do your personal SWOT analysis on a regular basis.
  •  Find your personal center of gravity and leverage it for all it’s worth.
  • Find ways to limit your weaknesses through mitigation, training, alliances, teambuilding, etc.
  • Adopt positive role models.
  • Get mentoring or coaching as needed.
  • Learn and practice the nuts and bolts of management and inspiration.
  • Do regular personal after action reviews to identify and consolidate lessons learned.
  • Seek and accept informed and intelligent counsel.
  • Ask for advice and suggestions from subordinates, and then make the decision.
  • Volunteer for important, “stretch” tasks and responsibilities.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to radically improve performance, grow, and thrive in the face of rapid change, harsh competition, and increasing uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

 

In the next weeks I will be focusing on each of the 10 leadership principles I learned as an officer in the army. This the first of these principles.

I always like to say that competence is the heart of leadership. Remember that competence consists of 3 domains: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

  • People want to follow leaders who are competent and able to lead them to victory.
  • The idea that you can be an effective leader while being a so-so manager is a myth. Leaders must be effective at planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling.
  • Be clear on your objective(s) before considering the factors and making a decision.
  • Make decisions as fast as required, but not so fast that you rush headlong into the first course of action that pops into your head.
  • Consider multiple courses of action before making a decision.
  • Surround yourself with the right people.
  • Create a strong team and organization.
  • Communicate clearly and directly.
  • Follow up and ensure effective and efficient implementation of your plans during execution.
  • Designate your main effort and give it the resources and attention it requires.

Richard Martin is The Master Strategist and Leadership Catalyst. An expert on strategy and leadership, Richard brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to thrive and grow in the face of rapid change, risk, and uncertainty.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Last week I gave a list of 10 lessons I learned about leadership, strategy, and management that I learned in my time in the Canadian Army and as a consultant, helping executives, entrepreneurs, and organizations to exploit change and achieve outstanding growth in results and performance. I promised 10 more this week, and they can be summarized as “Create the conditions for success,” so here goes:

  1. Never accept a situation as given. There is always something you can do to…
  2. Create the conditions for success, by…
  3. Shaping the “battlespace” and preparing the ground to your advantage.
  4. Then, make sure your people understand your vision, mission, and intent.
  5. Remember that people power is based on engagement, commitment, and initiative.
  6. Morale is about the will to fight, to persevere, and to win, not just about being happy and in a good mood.
  7. Care for your people and they will reciprocate.
  8. Keep things as simple as needed, but no simpler.
  9. Brilliant strategy and manoeuvres are essential, but they depend on careful logistical and administrative planning and routines.
  10. Remember that we fail as individuals but succeed as a team.

Richard Martin is a consultant, speaker, and executive coach. He brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to exploit change, maximize opportunity, and minimize risk.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

Last week I facilitated a sales planning retreat with a long-time client. The meeting brought together the sales people of six different offices in the company. The aim was to create common goals, processes, and systems. We discussed many different issues, but whenever we saw the discussion starting to come around to the same points again, I would break in and ask my client what the decision was and what actions would be needed to execute on it. This doesn’t appear like a big deal, but for this client it meant creating clarity on goals and actions where before there had been a lot of vague intentions. Just by asking what the decision was as a result of the discussion, we were able to generate a list for execution within a short time frame.

There is nothing wrong with gaining input by holding meetings. However, you must always close any discussion with a decision on next steps and clear direction for who will do what, by when, with whom, and with what resources.

Richard Martin is a consultant, speaker, and executive coach. He brings his military and business leadership and management experience to bear for executives and organizations seeking to exploit change, maximize opportunity, and minimize risk.

© 2014 Richard Martin. Reproduction and quotes are permitted with proper attribution.

I’ve been delivering this type of training and development throughout my 25-year military career, at university, on special training programmes for emergency management leaders, as well as nationally and internationally for corporate clients.

Get more information

Register Now!

“Richard helped me to realize my unique role as president and majority shareholder. This gave me the confidence to make some very important ownership decisions and to assert myself with my junior partners. I’ve become much more effective in leading and growing my company.”  Jean-Paul de Lavison, President, JPdL

Expected Results

  • Faster and more confident decision-making
  • Clearer direction to your subordinates
  • Deal with tricky situations and problem cases in a more confident and direct manner
  • Enhanced skill at judging and evaluating people
  • Provide effective feedback quickly while minimizing resistance
  • Outstanding influencing and communication skills
  • Overall performance improvement
  • More time for your priority objectives

Course Description

  • Starts Thursday 16 January 2014 at 11 am eastern
  • Course runs until early June 2014 with a total of 8 webinar sessions every three weeks (11 am to 12 pm)
  • Each webinar will include the knowledge you need to develop and improve your key leadership skills, as well as self-diagnostic and competency building exercises and other tools
  • Hard copy download of the slides, exercises, and other tools, as well as a video recording of the webinar within 48 hours of each session
  • You can post questions to a special discussion forum I will create for this course with access limited to current and future registrants. I will answer within 24 hours during normal working hours
  • Extra online discussions and exchanges on the forum

Cost

  • If you register before 3 January 2014: $249.00 ($199.00 for those currently registered for my 2013-14 teleconference series)
  • If you register after 3 January 2014: $349.00 ($299.00 for those currently registered for my 2013-14 teleconference series)
  • Who Should Register?
  • Entrepreneurs and business owners
  • Senior executives
  • Functional and line managers
  • Sales and business development professionals
  • Project and programme management professionals
  • HR and personnel selection professionals
  • Trainers and coaches
  • Anyone else who’s interested in growing and developing as a leader

Course Schedule

16 January 2014 — Session 1: Competence Is the Heart of Leadership

  • It’s good to sizzle, but first you need the steak
  • Do people follow you because they HAVE to or because they WANT to?
  • What specific competencies do you need?
  • What are your competencies now?
  • What do you want to/have to work on?

6 February 2014 — Session 2: Becoming a Transformational Leadership

  • What is transformational leader and how is it different from transactional leadership?
  • What are the components of transformational leadership?
  • Is transformational leadership really needed and better than more traditional and authoritarian forms?
  • Why rewards and punishments are more ineffective than effective
  • Your transformational leadership profile
  • What about charisma?

27 February 2014 — Session 3: Idealized Influence and “Command Presence”

  • What is your influence based on? Coercion vs conviction
  • Why leaders MUST be ethical
  • Leading by example
  • What is “command presence” and how do you create it?
  • Evaluate your own command presence

20 March 2014 — Session 4: Inspirational Motivation through Vision and Mission

  • Morale, cohesion, and unity of purpose
  • Intrinsic motivation and transformational leadership
  • What’s wrong with most vision and mission statements?
  • Creating a compelling purpose and vision
  • Rallying the troops in a crisis

10 April 2014 — Session 5: How Leaders Grow and Develop

  • Cognitive and moral development of adults
  • How these stages translate to leadership over time and through experience
  • Individualized Consideration and Intellectual Stimulation as part of Transformational Leadership
  • Selecting and developing potential leaders
  • Challenging your own leadership to grow and develop through the stages of leadership

1 May 2014 — Session 6: Crisis and Emergency Leadership

  • What is a crisis or emergency?
  • What happens during a crisis or emergency: group dynamics and individual psychology
  • What a leader must do before, during, and after a crisis
  • Leader’s self-care and welfare of followers and subordinates during a crisis or emergency

22 May 2014 — Session 7: How to Transform Organizations, Not Just Individuals

  • How organizations develop over time
  • The organizational types that correspond to the leadership stages
  • Why internal conflict is a good thing and how to foster it
  • Diagnosing teams and organizations
  • How to get to the next organizational level

12 June 2014 — Session 8: Putting It All Together: Self-Awareness as the Key to Continued Growth

  • Self-awareness
  • Self-knowledge
  • Self-control
  • Self-efficacy and self-esteem
  • Your continuing leadership development plan

Get more information

Register Now!

© 2013-14 Alcera Consulting Inc. All rights reserved.